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Scura, Wigfield, Heyer, Stevens & Cammarota Blog

The Added Requirements of Residential Construction Liens

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For most residential construction contractors, the risk of non-payment is a threat that, if realized, can cease the day-to-day operations of the business. Non-payment usually stems from a dispute between the owner and general contractor (“GC”) regarding the quality of the work. Regardless of whether you are a GC or subcontractor, the filing of a construction lien is a powerful weapon against non-payment. In the residential construction context, the filing of a construction lien has additional requirements above and beyond that of commercial construction. This article will discuss the added requirements necessary to validly record a residential construction lien claim.

Enforcing Your Rights as a Non-Residential Construction Subcontractor

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For most nonresidential construction subcontractors, the risk of non-payment on a job is a threat that, if realized, can cease the day-to-day operations of the business. Non-payment usually stems from a dispute between the general contractor and the subcontractor regarding the quality of the work. If you are a subcontractor, this article will explain your rights to lien property in efforts to ensure compensation for the work you have performed. Please note, the contents of this article only apply to liens involving non-residential construction contracts.

 

Owner or Tenant Representation in Lease and Business Disputes

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Leasing commercial space is more complex than renting an apartment, and in the current economy, both parties have more at stake. The experienced real estate lawyers of Scura, Wigfield, Heyer & Stevens, LLP, can protect your interests on the front end of commercial lease agreements or when conflicts arise regarding renewal, termination or violations. You don’t have to deal with your business disputes alone.

Tips for Creating a Living Will

Whereas a "normal" will dictates how a person's tangible assets will be distributed after death, a "living will" deals with an even more personal matter: a person's physical health. If you should become incapacitated for any reason such as the following, a living will can allow a loved one to make decisions regarding your medical treatment:

When You Might Need a New Jersey Probate Lawyer

 Probate is a legal process that takes place after someone dies. It includes:

  • proving in court that a deceased person's will is valid (usually a routine matter)
  • identifying and inventorying the deceased person's property
  • having the property appraised
  • paying debts and taxes, and
  • distributing the remaining property as the will (or state law, if there's no will) directs.

Wills and Trusts Can Protect Your Family’s Future

 

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